More than 100 graves robbed in Benin for voodoo rituals

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Practitioners of Voodoo must find human organs fit for ritualistic use which has survived into the twenty-first century as a major cultural force in this tiny country. About 70 % of Beninois still practice voudoo.  Benin is the birthplace of voodoo which incorporates evil sorcery or black magic in its philosophy.  The Caplatas (dark priests) are the world's first creators of controllable assassins by subjecting their "zombies" to dangerous drugs which made them suggestible to the point where they could be used to commit murders at the whim of the Caplata.  In many cases the zombies are used to kill people whose body parts can be used in cannibalistic rituals.

Today rogue elements in Western governments use sophisticated technology to break down the egos of targeted citizens and turn them into controllable assassins or zombies.  The primitive practice should not be tolerated in civilization because of the cruelty perpetrated on the person targeted to become the zombie.

During the slave trade days Voodoo was suppressed but it found its expression in a perverted version of Catholicism in that the Catholic saints were used to replace the Voodoo pantheon of entities referred to by the Caplatas as "Loa".  The Loa are very active in the world and can possess devotees during ritual. Rituals are practiced primarily to make offerings to the loa and to entreat the loa for aid or personal fortune in ones life.

The practice of using animals as sacrificial victims was accepted into American society on the theory that killing animals for food is the same as killing them for religious sacrifice.  This was a step down the path to depravity that we now see expressing itself in legalized torture of enemies on the battlefield and even torture of American citizens who disagree with the government.

File - Kenyan Paulo Nzili, right, with Wambugu Wa Nyingi, left, stand outside the Royal Courts of Justice, in central London, Thursday, April 7, 2011, as four elderly Kenyans who claim that they were severely beaten and tortured by British officers during an anti-colonial rebellion in the 1950s are taking their case to court in London.

The witch doctor takes flesh suitable for sacrifice, preferably human flesh and organs which have been harvested from a live person.  Since the White man moved in, the practice of killing one's enemies for human sacrifice has been outlawed so the witch doctors use the organs and flesh from cadavers.  Grave robbing has become a problem in Benin.

The witchdoctor creates an offering (a "veve") to the Loa by making a cake into which has been mixed sacrificial flesh and/or blood.  Each Loa has his or her specific veve which must be made according to instructions.  Most of the flesh and blood of the sacrificial victim is set aside for a feast.

To start the ceremony the witchdoctor prays to God to bless the invocation of the Loa.  Drums and rattles set the mood for the dancers, one of which becomes possessed by the Loa.  The dancer dances and jerks and cries energetically and, if desired, the dancer may nourish his or herself with some of the blood and flesh that has been prepared for the party.  It is believed that the dancer will be possessed by the Loa so when the dancer consumes the sacrificial bread, blood and flesh, the Loa is accepting the offering and the wish will be granted.  After the loa has been fed, the rest of the party may partake of the feast.

This ritual dates back to prehuman times.  It is reflected in the hunt, kill, and devourments of pack animals who follow a rigid hierarchy in the sharing of the meat from the kill.

 

The authorities in Benin are working hard to stamp out grave robbing, not only for the sake of the relatives who become agitated when the graves are disturbed, but for the health of the Voodoo people as well, because eating dead flesh is very injurious to health.  The consumption of human brain tissue leads to insanity even when fresh.